Instagram (instagram)

@instagram

#YoursToMake

followers count:  426,100,309
followers rank: 0
likes count:  437,158,022
like rank:  0

Account rate

Mathematical model that shows the popularity of an account relative to others.

Statistics

0
Average likes per post
0
Average comments per post

Photos and videos ratio

48% videos
52% photos
She said what she said 👑👏⁣
 ⁣
Reel by @lyrette_⁣
Music by @eugenekiing

She said what she said 👑👏⁣ ⁣ Reel by @lyrette_⁣ Music by @eugenekiing

“I am just a creative person always looking to do and try new things.” —Multi-hyphenate entertainer Emmy Hartman (@emmyhartman)⁣⁣
 ⁣⁣
“Everything I do is very personality-based and a form of self-expression. I put things out into the world for myself. If I think something’s cool, that’s why I do it. I always try to one-up myself in a creative sense and try to stay very authentic to who I am,” says the 22-year-old whose content includes fashion, music, comedy and makeup art. ⁣⁣
⁣⁣
“I think it’s sick to do something and not care what anyone has to say about it — doing something purely because you enjoy it and it’s your way of expressing yourself. As long as you feel good about yourself nothing else should matter.”⁣⁣
⁣⁣
Photo by @emmyhartman

“I am just a creative person always looking to do and try new things.” —Multi-hyphenate entertainer Emmy Hartman (@emmyhartman)⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ “Everything I do is very personality-based and a form of self-expression. I put things out into the world for myself. If I think something’s cool, that’s why I do it. I always try to one-up myself in a creative sense and try to stay very authentic to who I am,” says the 22-year-old whose content includes fashion, music, comedy and makeup art. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ “I think it’s sick to do something and not care what anyone has to say about it — doing something purely because you enjoy it and it’s your way of expressing yourself. As long as you feel good about yourself nothing else should matter.”⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Photo by @emmyhartman

“My music is a form of showing my emotions, showing that I am human and making people see through my eyes how I feel about the world,” says Urias Martins (@uriasss).

The Brazilian singer and model has performed at festivals celebrating Afro-Latinx and LGBTQ+ communities all over the world. But no matter how far she travels, her music always keeps her close to home.

“My music is the way it is ‘cause I was born and raised in Brazil. It is one of the things that makes me who I am. I could never deny that,” she says.

This #LatinxHeritageMonth, we’re turning up the volume on young artists like Urias, who are bringing their music, their culture and their heritage wherever they go. 🎶 🌎 🎶

Check out our story to hear the music that Urias is loving right now.

Reel and music by @uriasss

“My music is a form of showing my emotions, showing that I am human and making people see through my eyes how I feel about the world,” says Urias Martins (@uriasss). The Brazilian singer and model has performed at festivals celebrating Afro-Latinx and LGBTQ+ communities all over the world. But no matter how far she travels, her music always keeps her close to home. “My music is the way it is ‘cause I was born and raised in Brazil. It is one of the things that makes me who I am. I could never deny that,” she says. This #LatinxHeritageMonth, we’re turning up the volume on young artists like Urias, who are bringing their music, their culture and their heritage wherever they go. 🎶 🌎 🎶 Check out our story to hear the music that Urias is loving right now. Reel and music by @uriasss

 
“My perspective is that marginalized communities, women and children will suffer the most as a result of climate change and it is imperative to ensure the most vulnerable groups have access to adequate climate information.” —19-year-old Iranian American climate activist Sophia Kianni (@sophiakianni).

“My Iranian background has influenced my work by allowing me to learn that temperatures in the Middle East are rising more than twice the global average, and that 9 out of the 10 countries worst affected by climate change are a majority non-English speaking,” says Sophia, who’s the founder and executive director of Climate Cardinals (@climatecardinals) and the US representative on the UN’s Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change.

“I started Climate Cardinals because I noticed in middle school that there was a lack of climate resources available in languages other than English,” says Sophia. The international organization has translated more than 6,000 pages of climate information into 100 languages through a network of 8,000 volunteers whose average age is 16.

“My work seeks to ensure that young people have a seat at the table when it comes to international decision making and climate policy discussions because my generation will be worst affected by climate change if action is not taken.”

Photo by @sophiakianni

“My perspective is that marginalized communities, women and children will suffer the most as a result of climate change and it is imperative to ensure the most vulnerable groups have access to adequate climate information.” —19-year-old Iranian American climate activist Sophia Kianni (@sophiakianni). “My Iranian background has influenced my work by allowing me to learn that temperatures in the Middle East are rising more than twice the global average, and that 9 out of the 10 countries worst affected by climate change are a majority non-English speaking,” says Sophia, who’s the founder and executive director of Climate Cardinals (@climatecardinals) and the US representative on the UN’s Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change. “I started Climate Cardinals because I noticed in middle school that there was a lack of climate resources available in languages other than English,” says Sophia. The international organization has translated more than 6,000 pages of climate information into 100 languages through a network of 8,000 volunteers whose average age is 16. “My work seeks to ensure that young people have a seat at the table when it comes to international decision making and climate policy discussions because my generation will be worst affected by climate change if action is not taken.” Photo by @sophiakianni

“The uniqueness of my individual Black culture and experience is eccentric and unapologetically different from the multitude of stories out there. Our voices and our stories have been silenced, mishandled and reconstructed over the years. There are many Black stories to be told. So listen.” —Graphic designer and illustrator Aleea Rae (@aleearaeart)
 
Aleea’s first canvas was her body. “When I was a kid, my first masterpiece was on my arms and legs. My mom had to buy me a sketchbook.” These days her work comes alive on the screen with vibrant colors, shining rainbows and a healthy dose of glitter. “I love color in my work,” says Aleea, who’s 24. “As humans we have so much color and luminosity inside of us that comes from being alive.”
 
Aleea is currently hard at work on “Nocturnal,” her first fantasy digital comic series based on the adventures of main character Iris Evie. “During her 21st birthday, Iris discovers that she has the ability to shape-shift into a black cat with psychic abilities. She battles with her dual nature while also wrestling with college life and attempting to stand against the evil forces that threaten her.” 
 
#ShareBlackStories
 
Digital illustration by @aleearaeart

“The uniqueness of my individual Black culture and experience is eccentric and unapologetically different from the multitude of stories out there. Our voices and our stories have been silenced, mishandled and reconstructed over the years. There are many Black stories to be told. So listen.” —Graphic designer and illustrator Aleea Rae (@aleearaeart) Aleea’s first canvas was her body. “When I was a kid, my first masterpiece was on my arms and legs. My mom had to buy me a sketchbook.” These days her work comes alive on the screen with vibrant colors, shining rainbows and a healthy dose of glitter. “I love color in my work,” says Aleea, who’s 24. “As humans we have so much color and luminosity inside of us that comes from being alive.” Aleea is currently hard at work on “Nocturnal,” her first fantasy digital comic series based on the adventures of main character Iris Evie. “During her 21st birthday, Iris discovers that she has the ability to shape-shift into a black cat with psychic abilities. She battles with her dual nature while also wrestling with college life and attempting to stand against the evil forces that threaten her.” #shareblackstories Digital illustration by @aleearaeart

“It’s THE D SoraKi style. It’s a mysterious dance style that draws in the audience by capturing sound and expressing it with a unique sensation.” —THE D SoraKi (@the_d.soraki_dance) 🔥

“When I’m dancing freestyle, I don’t think about anything, I just feel the music. I think I can be myself in my heart!” says the 18-year-old dancer from Fujisawa, Japan.

“I’ve been listening to music since I was in the womb,” he says. “I researched the fusion of hip-hop, soul and all-style dance, and developed it with various types of music. It's still evolving. As your age, season and environment change, your senses change, and you evolve along with them. You can meet yourself with a new dance every day.”

And that’s what THE D SoraKi did during the pandemic lockdowns. “When there were no more events, I started posting every day, hoping that people all over the world would be energized by my dancing. I figured the same thing would be boring, so I evolved and practiced every day. I’m still in the middle of a dream. Dance and music always push me and help me grow.”

Reel by @the_d.soraki_dance
Music by @bluelab_beats

“It’s THE D SoraKi style. It’s a mysterious dance style that draws in the audience by capturing sound and expressing it with a unique sensation.” —THE D SoraKi (@the_d.soraki_dance) 🔥 “When I’m dancing freestyle, I don’t think about anything, I just feel the music. I think I can be myself in my heart!” says the 18-year-old dancer from Fujisawa, Japan. “I’ve been listening to music since I was in the womb,” he says. “I researched the fusion of hip-hop, soul and all-style dance, and developed it with various types of music. It's still evolving. As your age, season and environment change, your senses change, and you evolve along with them. You can meet yourself with a new dance every day.” And that’s what THE D SoraKi did during the pandemic lockdowns. “When there were no more events, I started posting every day, hoping that people all over the world would be energized by my dancing. I figured the same thing would be boring, so I evolved and practiced every day. I’m still in the middle of a dream. Dance and music always push me and help me grow.” Reel by @the_d.soraki_dance Music by @bluelab_beats

License to crawl.

On today’s #WeeklyFluff we are sneaking into the weekend with Lucky (@lucky_theblackcat_1), a 1-year-old American shorthair rescue cat who goes into stealth mode when she’s excited.

Reel by @lucky_theblackcat_1
Music by John Barry Orchestra

License to crawl. On today’s #weeklyfluff we are sneaking into the weekend with Lucky (@lucky_theblackcat_1), a 1-year-old American shorthair rescue cat who goes into stealth mode when she’s excited. Reel by @lucky_theblackcat_1 Music by John Barry Orchestra

 
Staying on the beat all the way through the week. 🥁💯

Keep the party going with more good vibes on today’s story.

Reel by @kennedyjardine
Music by @direalshaggy

Staying on the beat all the way through the week. 🥁💯 Keep the party going with more good vibes on today’s story. Reel by @kennedyjardine Music by @direalshaggy

When emojis hit different IRL. 🤪 🤭
 
Reel by @tarun_kinra
Music by Hanz Axl

When emojis hit different IRL. 🤪 🤭 Reel by @tarun_kinra Music by Hanz Axl

“Style and sustainability don’t have to be two separate things. They can be one and the same, and sustainable living itself should be fun.” —Black and Mexican creator Jazmine Rogers (@thatcurlytop) ⁣ ⁣ “One of my biggest motivations is to challenge the idea that sustainable fashion is boring. I love wearing bright colors and mixing fun patterns together; I always like to let my inner child dress me for the day in whatever it wants,” says Jazmine, who explores what it means to live a low-impact lifestyle and advocates for intersectional environmental change. ⁣ ⁣ “I love thrifting because there’s so much creativity involved. But there are many ways to be involved with sustainable fashion — rewearing pieces and loving the pieces you have is something we forget about when it comes to our clothing. And you can support small businesses, choose secondhand or support brands that actually care about the planet and people and have more ethical practices. It's just doing what you can with what you have. It takes individual and collective action to seed change that we want and bring the systemic change that we want to see.” ⁣ ⁣ Photos by @thatcurlytop

🌈✨ “I use my wardrobe to express my pride about myself and my community all year round,” says Jamie Windust (@jamie_windust).⁣
⁣
Last year, the presenter, model and author published “In Their Shoes,” a book exploring how to step into your truth when you identify as nonbinary.⁣
⁣
Check out our story right now to see more from Jamie as we continue to celebrate members of the LGBTQ+ community who #ShareWithPride.⁣
⁣
Photo by @jamie_windust

🌈✨ “I use my wardrobe to express my pride about myself and my community all year round,” says Jamie Windust (@jamie_windust).⁣ ⁣ Last year, the presenter, model and author published “In Their Shoes,” a book exploring how to step into your truth when you identify as nonbinary.⁣ ⁣ Check out our story right now to see more from Jamie as we continue to celebrate members of the LGBTQ+ community who #ShareWithPride.⁣ ⁣ Photo by @jamie_windust

 
“I’m pretty unapologetic for who I am, even though I should really come as a 1+1 deal with some earplugs.” —20-year-old creator Chammy Choi (@porojin) 😂😂😂 
 
"Humor is the underlying layer to my life. I make jokes about the happiest times in my life as well as the saddest because I think laughter is the best medicine,” says Chammy, who likes to mix things up with her dance, fashion and comedy videos. 
 
“I definitely cater my content to Asian Americans because I think there’s a severe lack of content geared towards our experience that isn’t based on generic stereotypes. And I think it’s important to use my platform to open conversations about overarching societal problems as well,” she says. “Being proud of the content I create and creating content that’s genuine to who I am is the most important thing to me.” 
 
Reel by @porojin

“I’m pretty unapologetic for who I am, even though I should really come as a 1+1 deal with some earplugs.” —20-year-old creator Chammy Choi (@porojin) 😂😂😂 "Humor is the underlying layer to my life. I make jokes about the happiest times in my life as well as the saddest because I think laughter is the best medicine,” says Chammy, who likes to mix things up with her dance, fashion and comedy videos. “I definitely cater my content to Asian Americans because I think there’s a severe lack of content geared towards our experience that isn’t based on generic stereotypes. And I think it’s important to use my platform to open conversations about overarching societal problems as well,” she says. “Being proud of the content I create and creating content that’s genuine to who I am is the most important thing to me.” Reel by @porojin

Subscribe to our notifications

Join the community of users with the latest news from all social networks!